Is Japanese cuisine healthy?

Author: Karen W.
Editor: Aika M.
Translator: Theo F.
Original Language: Japanese

Have you ever had Japanese food before? In 2013, Washoku, the traditional Japanese culinary culture, was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage. From this delegation, we can see that the traditional Washoku is up to a healthy standard, but what aspect of it is healthy? Furthermore, when you compare Japanese cuisine to foreign cuisines, it is apparent that Japanese cuisine revolves around fish and has lighter flavours, while foreign cuisines tend to use a higher variety of spices. This article aims to delve into the world of Washoku and explore the origins of its healthy nature.

To begin, let’s talk about the nutritious values Washoku offers. To have a healthy diet, we need to have a balance in nutrients. This balance mainly includes carbohydrates, protein, minerals, vitamins, and fat. This means that if we only have junk foods, we will not reach an ideal nutritious balance; the excess calories often lead to obesity and other health problems. On the contrary, even just one meal of Washoku contains an ideal balance of nutrients. This is due to the fact that the traditional Japanese menu contains Ichiju Sansai, one soup and three dishes. Although there are a total of four items, their portions are kept small, making it easy to eat. This allows us to taste different dishes and absorb different nutrients in one single meal.

To illustrate, let me give you an example of an actual Washoku meal I have had. Cooked with only water, the star of the meal is rice. It has a soft taste and usually goes well with all kinds of dishes. Since the weather is getting warmer, the main ingredients for the miso soup are the summer vegetables, eggplants and okra. The main dish of our meal is the staple goya chanpuru, an Okinawanian stir-fried dish with bitter melon, egg and tofu. Our side dish is a salad composed with summer vegetables and glass noodles. The second side dish contains chopped chicken breast and pickled plum for our daily intake of minerals. The ingredients used in this Washoku meal includes all forms of nutrients: rice for carbohydrates; egg, tofu, and chicken for protein; plums for minerals; summer vegetables for vitamins; and fat from glass noodles. As such, you can see how the traditional style of one soup and three dishes is healthy for us. Moreover, the incorporation of summer ingredients would really allow us to taste the season!

Actually, nutrition balance is not the only reason behind Washoku’s healthy nature. In Japan, chefs have developed cutting edge techniques to completely bring out the flavours of each ingredient. Although it differs from region to region, oil, sugar, and salt were not commonly used as condiments for cooking back in the days. Oil especially, was a luxurious item and was only used to light lamps. The latter half of the 19th century brought western cuisine influences to Japan where they started to implement the use of oil for cooking.
< https://japanese.hix05.com/Folklore/Food/food06.oil.html >

Let me introduce three traditional meals from the Chiba, Tokyo, and Saitama prefectures while highlighting the use of Japanese fish. In Chiba, we have “futomaki sushi” that is usually eaten during funerals and weddings. In Tokyo, we have Japan’s symbolic dish – sushi. Meanwhile in Saitama, we eat eels on the day of the ox. None of these traditional dishes incorporate the use of oil as they were not really available back in the days. Originally, sushi was actually called “box sushi” as it was preserved by fermenting fish with rice in a square wooden box. It was not until the Edo period that vinegar was added to the cooking process and sushi took on its present form.
< http://www.pref.chiba.lg.jp/annou/shokuiku/oishiichiba/dentou.html
https://www.gotokyo.org/jp/see-and-do/drinking-and-dining/tokyo-local-food/index.html
http://www.mizkan.co.jp/sushilab/manabu/4.ht >

In addition, the Japanese climate and environment provides a great influence that makes Japanese food healthy. The Japanese archipelago stretches from the North all the way to the South, and is exposed to all four natural seasons while surrounded by sea in all directions. As a result of this natural environment, we can harvest fresh seafood, vegetables, and fruits exclusive only to Japan. Different seasonal ingredients are also used in each region, which has given rise to unique local cuisine styles. 
< https://www.jice.or.jp/knowledge/japan/commentary01 >

The diversity of nature in turn influences the religious beliefs of Japanese people. The Japanese have a reverence for nature and a sense of “nature worship” – a belief in natural objects and phenomena which are then deified and worshipped. In connection to this, there are many annual events linked to the seasons and have a close relationship with food culture. For example, on New Year’s Day, we welcome the New Year’s God, who is believed to bring happiness, prosperity and a good harvest. The staple food for these celebrations is glutinous rice, due to the belief in rice cultivation. This glutinous rice is steamed, mashed and kneaded to make mochi, an offering to the New Year’s gods; it is decorated with two layers of round mochi, one large and one small, in the shape of a round mirror.

On New Year’s Day, we prepare “Osechi”, an offering to the New Year’s God. A five-tiered square container “jubako” contains dishes made from lucky charms to bring prosperity to the family. This dish is full of the characteristics of Japanese food, in that the quantity of each dish is not large, but the number of dishes is high. Some of the most important dishes in Osechi include the red and white kamaboko (fish cake), which is a symbol of good luck (with red to ward off evil and white for purity); date rolls that are shaped like the scrolls found in old Japanese books and a symbol of knowledge and culture; chestnut Kintoons that are golden in colour and symbolises good luck and wealth. There are also many other side dishes with the wishes of prosperity of descendants and longevity. As you can see, each of the dishes in Osechi has its own congratulatory meaning, but the wide variety of ingredients, including seafood and wild vegetables, makes it a nutritious and well-balanced dish.

I hope that having read this article you have learned some new things about Japanese cuisine. Feel free to try these healthy dishes if you are interested!

日本食は健康的なのか?

作者: Karen W.
編集者: Aika M.

みなさんは、日本食を食べたことがありますか??日本食は2013年に、「和食;日本人の伝統的な食文化」としてユネスコ無形文化遺産に登録されました。この評価で、日本食が「健康的」であり、日本人の伝統と関わりがあるということが分かります。しかし、この評価だけでは日本食のどのような点が「健康的」なのかわかりません。また、日本食は海外の食事スタイルと比較すると「味が薄い・魚が中心・決まった味付け・ワンプレート式ではない」など、様々な違いがあります。そこで、日本の学校に通っている皆さんに、日本食のことを深く知ってもらうため、日本食が「健康的」である理由を紹介します。

はじめに、日本食が健康的である理由を栄養素の面から紹介します。皆さんは、人が健康的な生活を送るために必要な条件を知っていますか?それは、「栄養バランスの取れた食事をとること」です。栄養バランスの良い食事には、「五大栄養素」が必要です。この「五大栄養素」とは、「炭水化物・タンパク質・ミネラル・ビタミン・脂質」です。普段から、ジャンクフードやスナックばかり食べる生活をしていると、この「五大栄養素」が不足しカロリー過多になることで、肥満になりやすくなります。これでは、健康的な食生活といえません。しかし、一食だけ日本食を食べる生活をしたら、バランスよく栄養を摂ることができます。なぜなら日本食の献立スタイルは、「一汁三菜」だからです。この言葉は、「一杯の汁物と三種類のおかず」という意味です。この食事は、品数は多いけれど、一つ一つのおかずの量が少ないところが特徴です。そしてこの食事の目的は、色々な料理を少しずつ食べることで、一品では不足してしまう栄養素を補い合うことです。

そこで、実際に一食だけ日本食のスタイルを取り入れた、日本人である私の、ある日の食事を例に挙げて説明します。この日の「主食」は、「ごはん」。水だけで炊くので、淡白な味わいになり、どんな料理にも合います。「汁物」は、最近暑くなってきたので夏野菜を使った「なすとオクラの味噌汁」。「主菜」は、夏の定番料理であるゴーヤと卵と豆腐の「ゴーヤチャンプル」。「副菜」は、「夏野菜の春雨サラダ」。「副副菜」は、不足しがちなミネラルをおいしく摂るために「ささみと梅干の和え物」です。この食事メニューで使われる食材は「炭水化物のご飯・タンパク質の肉、卵、豆腐・ミネラルの梅干・ビタミンのゴーヤ、なす、などの夏野菜・脂質の春雨サラダ」です。このように「一汁三菜」の食事スタイルを一回とっただけで、健康的な食生活にぐっと近づきました。さらに、夏の旬の食材を生かした料理なので、季節の味覚を味わうことができました。

次に、日本食が「健康的」なのは、単に栄養素バランスが良いだけではありません。実は日本では、食材の味わいを活かす「調理技術・調理道具」が発達しています。地域によって違いはありますが、日本食の味付けには、「油・砂糖・塩」があまり使われていません。現在の日本の食卓では欠かせないこれらの調味料は、日本固有の調理法では使われていませんでした。なぜなら、油は高価なものだったので、1800年後半に西洋の食文化が入ってくるまで、料理に使われることは滅多にありませんでした。それまでは、食用ではなく灯火用として使われていました。
(引用元 https://japanese.hix05.com/Folklore/Food/food06.oil.html )

日本の魚を使った郷土料理に焦点を当てて、油が使われてこなかった例を紹介します。千葉、東京、埼玉の三県を見てみましょう。千葉では、古くから冠婚葬祭の時に食べられていた「太巻きずし」、東京では、代表的な日本料理である「寿司」、埼玉では、丑の日に食べる「ウナギ」です。これらの三種類の料理には、調理中に油が使われていません。元々「寿司」は「箱寿司」といわれ、正方形の木箱の中で魚を米で発酵させることにより保存する料理でした。現在のように生で食べられるようになったのは、江戸時代ごろお酢が調理法に加えられて、今の「寿司」の形になってからです。「太巻きずし」が食べられるようになったのも、「寿司」にお酢が使われるようになってからです。
(引用元 http://www.pref.chiba.lg.jp/annou/shokuiku/oishiichiba/dentou.html
https://www.gotokyo.org/jp/see-and-do/drinking-and-dining/tokyo-local-food/index.html
http://www.mizkan.co.jp/sushilab/manabu/4.html )

さらに、日本食が「健康的」なのは、日本の風土や環境が大きく影響を与えています。日本は「春夏秋冬」の四つの季節があります。日本国土は弓なりの形をしていて、北は亜寒帯の北海道、南は亜熱帯の沖縄まで長くのびています。さらに、四方八方が海に囲まれた島国でありながら、山もたくさんあります。この自然環境のおかげで、新鮮な海の幸、野菜、果物、山の幸などを、国内だけで採ることができます。地域ごとに違った旬の食材が使われ、独自の郷土料理を生み出してきました。
(引用元 https://www.jice.or.jp/knowledge/japan/commentary01 )

また、海や山などの多様な自然環境は、日本人の宗教観にも影響を与えています。日本人は自然に対して畏敬の念を持ち、「自然崇拝」の心を持っています。「自然崇拝」とは、自然物・自然現象を対象とする信仰で、それらを神格化し崇拝します。それに関連して年中行事が数多く存在します。年中行事は季節と結びついたものが多く、食文化と密接な関わりがあります。例えば、一年の始まりの「正月」は、元旦に新年の神様である「年神様」が、一年の幸福・子孫繁栄・五穀豊穣をもたらすとされ、「年神様」をお迎えするための行事として始まりました。そんな正月の主食は、「自然崇拝」の一つの「稲作信仰」から、もち米が使われています。もち米を蒸した後、それをつぶして練り固めたものが「餅」になります。「餅」は年神様へのお供えものとして、「鏡餅」といわれる円形の鏡をモチーフにした丸餅を、大小二段重ねにして飾ります。

正月は「おせち」という、年神様にお供えする田茂の供物料理を用意します。重箱といわれる五段ある正方形の容器に、家族の繁栄を願う縁起物を使った料理が入っています。一品一品の量は多くはないけれど、品数が多いという日本食の特徴が詰まった料理です。いくつかある「おせち」のおかずの中から、欠かせないものを紹介します。まず「紅白かまぼこ」は、「魔よけの紅と清浄の白でめでたい」の意味があります。「伊達巻き」は、日本の昔の本の「巻物」を意識した形をしており、「知識や文化の発達を願う」という意味があります。「栗きんとん」は、黄金色で縁起が良く「蓄財」の意味があります。「ちょろぎ」は「長寿を願う」という意味があります。他にも「子孫繁栄・不老長寿」の願いを込めたおかずが数多くあります。このように、「おせち」はおかずの品々にそれぞれおめでたい意味が込められていますが、海産物や山菜など多様な食材を使っているため、栄養価も高くバランスの良い料理になっています。
(引用元 https://allabout.co.jp/gm/gc/220732/ )

みなさんはこの記事を読んで、日本食が健康的である理由が分かりましたか?日本食のスタイル「一汁三菜」は、栄養素バランスがよく取れるので、健康的な食生活を送ることができます。また、「おせち」をはじめとして、様々な行事食があります。ぜひ、実際に体験してみてください!

Autumn stimulates appetite

Author: Karen W.
Editor: Aika M.
Translator: Juri A.
Original Language: Japanese

Hello everyone. The hot summer is over and now it is more comfortable for some people since it gets cooler. Autumn indicates the period of three months between September and November. Also, this period of time are called “食欲の秋(Shokuyoku-no-aki)” in Japan, which means “Autumn stimulates appetite”. During this period, we consciously enjoy our daily life more than we usually do.

Thus, we are going to introduce this Japanese cultural belief in this article following the last article about “Otsukimi”.

1. Why does Autumn stimulate our appetite?

First off, here are two explanations for the reasons why we call it as  “食欲の秋”(Shokuyoku-no-aki).

Firstly, Autumn is usually the season that makes the temperature go down and the daylight hours get shorter in comparison to Summer. This makes the human body tend to promote fat-burning and require more energy. People eat food to absorb energy and this circulation makes us hungry.
Secondly, we have a wide variety of food in Japan. We are able to obtain more nourishing foods since Autumn is the best season to harvest. Such food contain necessary nourishments for the shattered body due to the change of the seasons, such as starchineness, vitamins and fiber.

These nourishments are also a necessity for us to go through the nippy winter. Plenty of nutritious foods are harvested in Autumn. This is how Autumn in Japan became to be called “食欲の秋(Shokuyoku-no-aki)”. In order to provide the valuable information for you to enjoy the blessing of nature in this season well, next chapter introduces “秋の味覚(Aki-no-mikaku)”, which means the taste of Autumn.

2.Taste of Autumn

Autumn is the best season to harvest these following foods: skipjack tuna, salmon and mackerel pike from the sea. Chestnut, persimmon, pear, purple, mushrooms and potatoes from the mountains are also delicious at this time of year. Moreover, the picking season for root crops comes in Autumn. In addition, rice, which is a pillar of Japanese food, is ripe for the taking as well and the new rice is getting lined up in the store shelves. 

炊き込みご飯(Takikomi-gohan)

I recommend “炊き込みご飯(Takikomi-gohan)”, which goes well with sea foods and mountain foods. 炊き込みご飯(Takikomi-Gohan) can be boiled with Japanese condiments that would not offset the taste of ingredients. Boiled rice with mushrooms fuel our appetite. Also, you can enjoy boiled rice with fish.

Some people might have concerns about gaining weight as we have ample tasty meals like this. If that describes you, I suggest having a lesser amount of food for one bite and to bite slowly. This should be the best way to taste the blessings of the Autumn.

Nowadays, we see Autumn food more in convenience stores. Now it might be easier to enjoy Autumn as we do in Japan, have a great time by enjoying the Autumn.

Sources:
食欲の秋に食欲が増す理由!その由来や秋に食べたい食べ物、食べすぎの対策もご紹介|コラム|鰹節・だし専門店 通販のことならにんべんネットショップ (ninben.co.jp)

食欲の秋

作者: Karen W.
編集者: Aika M.

 皆さん、こんにちは!
暑い夏が終わり、気温が下がり過ごしやすい秋になりました。秋は9月から11月の3ヶ月を指し、日本では「○○の秋」というように、秋の生活を楽しむ文化があります。そこで、「お月見」の記事に続き、今回は「食欲の秋」を紹介します。 

1. 食欲の秋とは

 まずはじめに、なぜ「食欲の秋」と言われるのか、2つ理由を説明します。

 1つ目は、秋は夏に比べると、日照時間が短くなり、気温が下がるからです。そのため人間の身体は、脂肪を燃焼しやすくなり、多くのエネルギーを必要とします。
 2つ目は、日本は自然が豊かで、特に秋は収穫最盛期で、栄養価の高い食べ物が多く収穫できるからです。秋の食べ物は、季節の変わり目で疲れてしまう身体に必要な栄養素である「でんぷん質、高タンパク質、ビタミン、食物繊維」が多く含まれています。また、これらの栄養素は、寒い冬を乗り越えるために必要なものです。

 これらの理由から、秋は「食欲の秋」と言われています。次の章では、自然の恵みをおいしくいただくために「秋の味覚」を紹介します。

2. 秋の味覚

 秋になると、海の幸は「戻り鰹(もどりがつお)、鮭、秋刀魚」、山の幸は「栗、柿、梨、ぶどう、きのこ類、さつまいも」、野菜類は「にんじん、里芋、蓮根」などの根菜類が収穫の時期を迎えます。さらに、日本食を支える「お米」も秋に収穫の季節を迎え、新米がスーパーで売られるようになります。

炊き込みご飯

 私は、海の幸と山の幸を一緒に食べられる「炊き込みご飯」をおすすめします。「炊き込みご飯」は、食材の味を活かした日本の調味料を使い、ご飯と食材を一緒に炊きます。「栗ご飯、さつまいもご飯」は甘く、「キノコご飯」は食欲をそそり、「魚の炊き込みご飯」は美味しく食べることができます。

 もちろん、このように美味しいものが増える秋には、「太ってしまうかもしれない」と気にする方もいると思います。そんなときは、口に入れる食べ物の量を少なくして、よく噛んで、秋の恵みをゆっくり味わってください。

 これらの秋の料理は身近なコンビニでも見かけるようになりました。お手頃価格で「日本の秋の味覚」を楽しむことが出来るので、みなさんもぜひ楽しんでください!

参考文献:
食欲の秋に食欲が増す理由!その由来や秋に食べたい食べ物、食べすぎの対策もご紹介|コラム|鰹節・だし専門店 通販のことならにんべんネットショップ (ninben.co.jp)

Moon-viewing Festival

Author: Karen W.
Editor: Aika M.
Translator: Theo F.
Original Language: Japanese

At the advent of Autumn in Japan, several cultural themes emerge and affect different aspects of life – be it literature, sports, or even cuisine. Amongst which, today we would like to write about Tsukimi, or the Moon-viewing festival in English. Throughout history, the moon has always been involved with Japanese cultural practices. Let’s learn more about Tsukimi!

1. What is Moon-viewing?

Moon-viewing is an autumn tradition where friends and family gather and appreciate the beauty of the celestial body. On Tsukimi nights, it is said that the moon can be seen in its brightest and most elegant state. Although, based on the lunar calendar, the festival is also called “the fifteenth night,” Tsukimi usually falls on a different day each year. In 2021, it falls on the 21st of September, a Tuesday.

2. The origin of Tsukimi

Back in the Heian Period of Japan, nobles and aristocrats had the custom of holding banquets under the lunar light. The tradition even spread to peasants later in the Edo Period. Moreover, the Tsukimi tradition coincided with the harvest season and thus became a festival amongst peasants where they show gratitude towards nature and the moon. In combination, these traditions slowly developed into the modern moon-viewing festival.

3. Moon-viewing Offerings

In reality, Tsukimi is not just a festival where you stare at the moon. Special offerings are made to be thankful towards a successful harvest.

The three main offerings are silver grass, moon-viewing dumplings, and agricultural products. Silver grass is said to protect the harvest and be the symbol for good harvest. Round little Moon-viewing dumplings – modeled based on the moon – are the symbol for gratitude. Agricultural products, mainly sweet potatoes and chestnuts, are usually crops successfully obtained from the season.

Conforming to the festive atmosphere, let’s make some Tsukimi dumplings!

Ingredients for 15 pieces

Dumpling flour 100g *

Room-temperature Water 80ml

Boiling Water (amount as you see fit)

Cold Water (amount as you see fit)

*Dumpling flour : available in supermarkets or 100-yen shops

Instructions

  1. Slowly mix dumpling flour and room-temperature water in a bowl; knead them until they are as hard as earlobes
  2. Divide them into 15 equal pieces and roll them into sphere shapes
  3. Put them into boiling water for 2 minutes
  4. As they float up to the surface, wait for another 3 minutes and drain the hot water afterwards
  5. Dip them into cold water
  6. Drain all the water
  7. Done!

*Sprinkle some red beans or soybean flour for an even better taste!

As you can see, Tsukimi dumplings are pretty easy to make. We hope you’ll get creative and enjoy your once-a-year Moon-viewing festival!

お月見

作者: Karen W.
編集: Aika M.

日本では秋になると「○○の秋」といって、読書やスポーツ、食事などをテーマに楽しむ文化があります。その中でも今回紹介する文化は、「お月見」です。日本では昔から、月を愛でる風習があります。みなさんも「お月見」を知ることで、より深く日本の文化について学んでいきましょう!

1.お月見とは

「お月見」とは、秋の風物詩で、その名の通り月を眺める行事のことです。この時期は、最も明るく、美しい月を眺めることができるとされていて、別名「十五夜」と呼ばれています。月の満ち欠けを基準とする旧暦と太陽の動きを基準とする新暦にずれが生じるため、毎年「お月見」の日は異なります。2021年の「お月見」は、9月21日(火)です!

2.お月見の由来

日本で「お月見」をするのには由来があります。まず平安時代に貴族たちの間で、月を眺めながら宴を開く風習として流行しました。また江戸時代に入ると、庶民の間にまで流行しました。秋は稲を収穫する時期であるため、庶民が収穫祭や初穂祭として自然の恵みに感謝をする日とされていました。この2つの習慣が合わさり、今の「お月見」のスタイルへと変わりました。

3.お供え物

  「お月見」は、月を眺めるだけでなく、月に見立てたものや収穫物をお供えする風習があります。今回は、そのお供え物について紹介します!お供え物は主に、ススキ、月見団子、農作物(芋類)の3つです。ススキは、災いから収穫物を守り、豊作を願う意味が込められています。月見団子は、丸い形が満月を連想させるため、月に収穫の感謝を表しているとされています。農作物のお供え物は、この時期に収穫されたばかりの芋類や栗、旬な野菜をお供えし、収穫に感謝をします。 

それではここで、お供え物の月見団子の作り方を紹介します!

材料(15個分)

団子粉 100g *

水   80ml

お湯  適量

冷水  適量

*団子粉:100円ショップやスーパーなど、どこでも購入することができます。

  作り方

  1. ボウルに団子粉、水を加え、よく練ります。
  2. 練り終わったら、15等分にして丸めます。
  3. それを沸騰したお湯に2分入れます。
  4. 浮き上がってきてから3分ゆで、お湯を切ります。
  5. 冷水にさらします。
  6. 水気を切り、器に盛りつけたら完成です。

*小豆やきな粉などかけて食べるとさらに美味しくなります。

このように簡単に月見団子を作ることができます。ぜひ皆さんも年に一度しかない「お月見」を楽しんでください!